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4325 Portfolio Assignment F13

Page history last edited by kknight 6 years, 10 months ago

EMAC 4325 Final Portfolio

Fall 2013

 

 


 

Purpose:

 

  • To demonstrate familiarity with theoretical and material connections between analog and digital forms of text, image, sound, and moving image.
  • To explore new models of digital production, including short forms and collaboration.
  • To engage in processes of feedback and revision to improve their work.

 

Overview:

 

In order to better grasp the way that meaning is made in different media forms, students need to take the ideas from class readings and discussions and apply them to the production of one story or argument in four different digital media objects. The production of these objects will take place in a scaffolded structure wherein students compose early versions, receive feedback, and improve them.

 

Students will be introduced to new tools for producing digital media objects each week in class.  These introductions will take the form of Tool Workshops led by their peers.  In addition students should browse the Tool Reviews and resource indexes in the course wiki.  Students are not required to use tools that are listed in the wiki, but in the spirit of collaboration and community, they should add any tools that they are using to the Resource Index pages.

 

 

Instructions:

 

  • What's in the portfolio? 
    • Four digital media objects, one each for text, still image, sound, and moving image.
      • Multimedia pieces are acceptable, however each should foreground one of the different media forms.  
      • You may use the sound piece in the moving image object, but other than that you should compose a different media object for each workshop. 
    • Collaboration is allowed, but multiply the length requirements by the number of collaborators. You may collaborate on one or all media objects, but not on the final paper.
    • In addition to the digital media objects, each portfolio should also contain a short research paper (600 - 900 words) that makes an argument about digital textuality.  
    • See sections below for specifications on each particular media object and for additional items due in the Portfolio.
  • Topic
    • At the beginning of the semester, each student will choose a story or argument with which they will work all semester.
    • The story or argument may be derived from one of the student's other classes or capstone, but all work turned in should be original work composed for this class and may not be graded as part of any other class or assignment.
  • Audience
    • Consider your audience to be educated professionals interested in topics of emerging media.  
  • Turning it in
    • The portfolio materials must be copied into or linked from your course participant page in the class wiki.  
  • Each student will give a 5-minute presentation in which they present their portfolio work at the end of the semester.

 

Technical Details:

  • Students should employ Revision Control so that version 1 can be submitted along with the final version in the portfolio.
  • If students need equipment to capture images, video, or sounds, EMAC has equipment available to borrow. Borrowing can be arranged through the ATEC equipment inventory. The UTD Library will also loan equipment.
    • To borrow equipment in the ATEC building, visit room ATC 2.402 M-F 8am - 10pm. You will need your net-id number and some form of photo id.
  • Be sure to allow plenty of time during the drafting process and before the final due date for technical difficulties.

 

Digital Media Objects - Specific Requirements

 

Text

  • 600 - 900 words. 
  • Possible formats for the text media object include:
    • Digital Text: 600 - 900 words that is formatted for a specific digital platform (wiki, blog, twitter, goAnimate, storify, google+ posts, facebook posts, tumblr posts, etc.).
    • Other ideas must be cleared with Kim prior to the due date of version 1. 
  • In addition to the criteria in the Grading section below, text-specific qualities include
    • use of language including word choice, tone, imagery, and creative strategies such as alliteration, anachronism, personification, simile, and metaphor, among others; takes advantage of digital platforms, media, or applications to primarily engage in or represent language-based interpersonal or interpersonal communication for an audience; it may be interactive or transformative but is always carefully composed and well-organized and avoids being lazy.
    •  

Still Image

  • Generally 8 - 10 images, unless otherwise noted. 
  • Possible formats for the still image media object include:
    • Comic: A comic strip of 8 - 10 frames.
    • Photo Essay: A photo-essay of 8 - 10 original or creative-commons-licensed images (or a mixture).
      • You may only use creative commons images if:
        • the image is of an object or situation that is rare or inaccessible enough that you could not capture it yourself.
          • Note that this does include quality. 
        • or the image is heavily modified.
      • If you use creative commons images, you must follow the terms of the license and give proper attribution.
    • Single Image: One image that proves the old adage, "a picture is worth 1,000 words." This must be an original composition.
    • Collage: A collage composed of 8 - 10 source images (original, creative-commons, or a mixture).
      • The same cc guidelines apply as to the photo essay.
    • Visualizations: A series of 8 - 10 images static data or text visualizations.
    • Other ideas must be cleared with Kim prior to the due date of the version 1.
  • In addition to the criteria in the Grading section below, image-specific qualities include 
    • Title that directs the viewer's engagement with the image object
    • Well composed
      • The image is arranged such that the details are purposeful or have meaning (or purposely obscure meaning)
      • data or text visualizations have a connection between form and data that enhances the author's purpose
      • Analog materials and words are used with clear intent
    • Focus is used for clarity or to direct the viewer's engagement
    • Light and shadow are used with purpose t emphasize aspects of the image; this may also include emphasis through absence
    • Color is ousted to support meaning through the creation of tone or use of symbolism
    • Narrativity is achieved through pacing, the relation of images to one another, and the composition of individual images

 

Sound

  • 60 - 90 seconds.
  • Possible formats for the sound media object include:
    • Composition: Original musical compositions, abstract, vocal, or instrumental.
    • Recording: Original audio recordings of narrative, events, environmental sounds, noise, etc.
    • Remixing: Remixes or mashups of public domain or creative commons music and recordings.
      • The remixed version should heavily modify the source material.
    • Other ideas must be cleared with Kim prior to the due date of version 1.
  • In addition to the criteria in the Grading section below, sound-specific qualities include dynamics (volume), levels, layering of sound (the micro-hum!), use of silence and noise, the creation of mood through tempo, tone, and texture, embracing abstraction. Though you may combine media sound should be used as the primary means of signifying.
  •  

 

Moving Image

  • 60 - 90 seconds.
  • Possible formats for the moving image media object include:
    • Video Production: narrative, informative, time lapse photography (converted to video), music video, etc. 60 - 90 seconds.
    • Animation: narrative, informative, etc. 60 - 90 seconds. (note that this does not include GoAnimate or XtraNormal, which are too text heavy)
    • Remixing: Two or more videos combined to total 60 - 90 seconds.
    • Other ideas must be cleared with Kim prior to the due date of the first version.
  • In addition to the criteria in the Grading section below, the specific qualities of moving images include the communication of narrative or argument through tone (established through color, sound, music, or pacing), mise-en-scene (through setting, lighting, sound, camera angles, and framing), atmosphere (through lighting, dialogue, costume, music), the composition of shots including focus and the movement of figures or the camera, pacing and the purposeful use or refusal of linearity (through montage, sound, repetition, foreshadowing, flashback). These may be used for literal or abstract representation, leaving various degrees of interpretation up to the viewer.
  •  

 

Portfolio

  • Should include:
    • Final versions of the four digital media objects, including a short explanation of revisions you made.
    • The 600 - 900 word paper.
      • In addition to the digital media objects, each portfolio should also contain a short research paper (600 - 900 words) that makes an argument about digital textuality.
        • Cite 3 or more readings to support your argument. Use any citation format consistently.
        • You can reference your media objects in the research paper to help supplement your argument. 
      • Options for uploading the paper include:
        • 1. Cut and paste the contents of the paper into your wiki page or wherever you are hosting your portfolio. If you do this, please be sure to double check to ensure that your formatting (particularly paragraph breaks) remains intact.
        • 2. Upload the paper to google drive and include a link to your portfolio. Don't forget to set the sharing settings so Kim can view it.
    • First versions of the four digital media objects. 
    • Everything should be linked from your course participant page on the wiki. 

 

Grading

 

The Portfolio is worth 50% of your final grade.  You will be graded on the following criteria:

 

  Excellent
Good
Satisfactory
Needs Improvement
Failing
Media object content
Media objects are consistently interesting or thought-provoking.  Any obfuscation is meaningful and purposely employed. Media objects are mostly interesting or thought-provoking. Any obfuscation is meaningful and purposely employed. Media objects have a clear argument or idea and are occasionally interesting or thought-provoking. Any obfuscation is meaningful and purposely employed.
Media objects may lack a clear idea or focus. Media objects may be boring.
One or more media objects is off-topic or so unclear as to be unintelligible. 

Media form

(see above for more about the signifiers of each medium)

Media objects are consistently daring or interesting on the formal level and utilize the unique affordances of each medium. The form enhances the meaning and is designed to appeal to the intended audience. Media objects are well-composed and mostly utilize the unique affordances of each medium. For the most part the design appeals to the intended audience.  The form of each media object supports effective communication and attempts to use the unique affordances of each medium. Additionally, each media object indicates an awareness of the audience.
One or more media objects may be unclear, the form disconnected from meaning, or exhibit confusion about the audience.
One or more media objects fails to communicate, is off-topic, formally obscures meaning, or ignores the audience.

Remixing and re-use

(if applicable)

Media objects amplify aspects of the  source material and consistently enhance meaning.
Media objects amplify aspects of the source material and are generally used to enhance meaning. 
Media objects amplify aspects of the  source material.
Repurposed material is used ineffectively.
Source material is largely unaltered or becomes unintelligible in repurposing. 
Drafting and Revising First versions are full-length and polished. Feedback for peers is consistently concrete and constructive. The student's revisions make extensive improvements to their own work.
First versions are full-length and polished. Feedback for peers is mostly concrete and constructive. The student's revisions show substantial effort and generally improve their work. First versions are full-length and mostly polished. Feedback for peers makes a substantial effort to give concrete and constructive feedback. The student's revisions show substantial effort. First versions may be short or in draft form. Feedback for peers or revision of one's own work may lack substance. First versions are never completed. The student may give unhelpful feedback or fail to revise their own work.
Research Paper The research paper is consistently thought-provoking and well-organized. The author uses well-chosen sources to enhance meaning. The research paper is generally thought-provoking and well-organized. The author uses sources carefully in support of meaning. The research paper is well-organized and interesting. The author's use of sources does not obscure their own voice. The paper may lack clarity or be boring. Sources may be missing or obscure the writer's voice. The paper may be off-topic, fail to cite sources, or may be unintelligible.

 

 

Things that will detract from your grade:

  • Failure to meet minimum length requirements.
  • Late materials, including first versions. See the "Late Work" section for more information. 
  • Missing items from the final portfolio.
  • Ignoring the license(s) of repurposed media objects. 
  • Failure to present your portfolio, in the time allotted, at the end of the semester.

 

A Word About Late Work

  • First versions: Each instance of late first versions of written/image/video/acoustic work will result in a loss of 1/3 of a grade on the final portfolio. If you are not in class for the portfolio workshop, your work is considered late. Neither Kim nor your peers will respond to late first versions.
  • Final portfolio: Final portfolios will be marked down one letter grade for each day (or fraction thereof) that they are late.
  • Presentations: Late presentations are not allowed. 

 

A Word About Drafting and Revising

  • You'll notice the use of the terms "version" instead of "draft."  That is because these are not "rough drafts."  On days that first versions are due, you should bring in a polished and completed object so that your peers may give you as much helpful feedback as possible.
  • It is important that feedback is given constructively and with respect.  It is also important that feedback be concrete and specific.  We will come up with peer review guidelines in class on portfolio workshop days. 
  • You will receive feedback from multiple student peers as well as from Kim or Brianni. Though you are required to revise your work, you do not have to make any of the specific changes suggested during peer review. However, if you are hearing similar suggestions from multiple people, you would be wise to strongly consider them. 
  • Make sure to retain copies of your first version of each media object to include in the portfolio.

 

Timeline and Due Dates

  • Sept 24: Text Object, Version 1 due in class.
    • Put a link on your course participant page.
  • Oct 15: Still Image Object, Version 1 due in class.
    • Put a link on your course participant page.
  • Nov 5: Sound Object, Version 1 due in class.
    • Put a link on your course participant page.
  • Dec 3: Moving Image Object, Version 1 due in class.
    • Put a link on your course participant page.
  • Dec 10 Presentations and Final Portfolio due.
    • Tuesday, December 10 1pm - 3:45pm
    • 5 minutes each 
      • You may focus on selected media objects or give a brief overview of the entire portfolio.
    • If you go over 5 minutes, you will lose 1/3 of a letter grade on your portfolio.

 

Peer Review Groups

 

(Same as Reading Response Groups)

 

Andrew C

Jesus

Shababa

 

Anna

Debi

Billy

Andrew W

 

Tiffany

DJ

Eva

 

 

Erika

Kristin

Carrie

 

Bailey

Carey

Michelle

 

Angie

AJ

Allison

 

Corinne

Samia

Cintia
Shab

 

Jay

Christa

Morgan

 

Cameron

Aaron

Carissa

 

 

 

 

 

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